Wild Horses on N.C. Beach – How and Where?

Wild Horses on Shackleford Banks, N.C. - Could this be my next writing topic for historical fiction or a scholarly paper?

In the days of high sea adventures – pirates and colonial sea trade – shipwrecks were not unusual. The horses you see here are a band or harem we saw December 2016 on Shackleford Banks, a small barrier island near the historic sea town of Beaufort, N.C. They are thought to be descendants of 16th or 17th Century Spanish mustangs that swam to shore after a shipwreck or were abandoned by early Spanish explorers. The Shackleford Banks herd (Banker Horses) number about 120, and they roam in small harems or band, each group led by a dominating stallion. Shackleford Banks, a barrier island in the Cape Lookout National Seashore, is managed by the National Park Service. During our visit we watched the horses roll around in the shallow tide and dig for fresh water. Keep your distance. Read more about these wild horses and how to see them and other historic sites in Beaufort and Fort Macon.

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mhpillion

I am a former television news journalist and current part-time Duke University Graduate student (Master of Arts in Liberal Studies). Reading, writing and traveling bring joy to my life. My time in grad school has reaffirmed my belief that we are always learning and we are at our best when we are open to words and ideas. For a bit more: My favorite place in the world is Hawksnest Beach on the island of St. John, USVI. Some of my favorite reads include Caribbean, Song of Soloman, Tale of Two Cities, Pudd'n Head Wilson and Wide Sargasso Sea. I'm a native North Carolinian and graduate of N.C. State University

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